Ardsley History | Ardsley Westchester County New York
Early evening over the Bear Mountain Bridge

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Ardsley History


Ardsley

Westchester County


Weckquaesgeek Indian Mohican tribe Algonquin nation Philipse Manor American Revolution  Ashford Post Office sawmill gristmill River Civil War patriot Putnam Railroad New Croton Aqueduct General Washington Count de Rochambeau French Army Point of Interest Ardsley History

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The Town of Ardsley is located in the municipality of Ardsley in the southwestern part of Westchester County, NY. The Village of Ardsley was originally inhabited by the Weckquaesgeek Indians, a branch of the Mohican tribe of the Algonquin nation. By the late 1600's, the land became part of the vast Philipse Manor. During the Revolution, Philipse remained loyal to the King and was forced to flee. His land was confiscated by the State and sold mostly to former tenants who had supported the patriot cause. The Village, then called Ashford, grew slowly.

There was a sawmill and gristmill on the Sawmill River, a blacksmith shop, and by the time of the Civil War, three pickle factories. In the early 1880's the Putnam Railroad was built, and the New Croton Aqueduct was constructed. A "boom" followed. Many lots were sold and developed, electric lights were installed and roads were improved. In 1883, since there already was an Ashford Post Office in the state, the Village name was changed to Ardsley. On March 2, 1883 the first Postmaster was appointed. The Village was incorporated in 1896. By 1898 the population had grown to 372.

Point of Interest: In 1781, Ardsley Village was the campsite for both General Washington and Count de Rochambeau, the commander of the French Army who helped the colonists in the American Revolution.


Location: Ardsley

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